KCABJ Newsletter for May 2017

May 19, 2017 - Leave a Response

KCABJ Academy

Only one person mailed in an application for the KCABJ Urban Student Journalism Academy before the April 29 deadline.

Because of that, the program is being canceled this year. The class has to have a minimum of six students and a maximum of 12 to occur.

The young lady who applied was informed in writing that like college classes that don’t have enough students enroll, the academy would not occur this year. However, we will try again next year with the hope that more high school and college students will show an interest in journalism careers.

KCABJ has offered the academy since 1982. There have been only three years that it has not occurred either because of a lack of interest expressed by students or staffing problems.

NABJ News

The National Association of Black Journalists in its NABJ Journal features a cover story on the black press having a standing exhibit at the new Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C.

The NABJ Convention will take place from Aug. 5-13 in New Orleans. People who plan to attend should make their reservations at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside Hotel before July 5. The hotel is offering rooms for $159 a night. Convention-goers are urged to register for the conference before June 1 to save big.

The honorary co-chairs for the convention are Warren Bell and Michelle Miller. The convention theme is “Power Up and Break Through.”

The NABJ Elections Committee has certified a slate of candidates for the 2017-2019 Board of Directors. Sarah Glover is running unopposed for president. For Vice President-Broadcast, Gayle Hurd is facing Dorothy Tucker. For secretary, Cheryl Smith is running unopposed. For Region I director, Johann Calhoun is running unopposed as is Ken Lemon for Region III director. Four persons are running for student representative on the board. They are Kyra Azore at Howard University, Wilton Jackson at Louisiana State University, Lawrence Malloy at Fort Valley State University and Gladys Sargeant at Hampton University. For more information go to nabj.org.

In other NABJ News, April Ryan was named NABJ Journalist of the Year. She is with the American Urban Radio Networks covering the White House.

NABJ also expressed its dismay at allegations of a hostile racial environment at Fox News. Eleven current and former Fox News employees have filed a class action lawsuit against the leading cable news network.

NABJ has launched a Black Male Media Project to help change the lives and image of black males. The first program of its kind will occur June 10 in cities nationwide.

“The program is designed to inspire, support and develop training and mentorship opportunities for black men working in journalism and media and those that aspire to,” NABJ notes. “All NABJ chapters are invited to join the dialogue on June 10 by creating local workshops and sessions aimed at cultivating skills and broadening the networking opportunities for black men in media. This program is not exclusive to black participation and is aimed at helping all people engage around the value of black males working in newsrooms and media.”

Participating chapters will use #InspireBlackMen to promote the project.

“The second phase of the NABJ Black Male Media Project will be a digital photography project showcased at the NABJ Annual Convention & Career Fair from Aug. 9-13 in New Orleans, Louisiana. NABJ members will be invited to share positive pictures of black men where they are, as they are.

“NABJ chapters interested in hosting one of the concurrent June 10 training programs should contact NABJ Council of Presidents Chair Ken Lemon by April 14 to indicate interest at InspireBlackMen@gmail.com.

Media outlets and general questions may direct inquiries to: InspireBlackMen@gmail.com. Partnership inquiries may be addressed to JoAnne Lyons Wooten at jlwooten@nabj.org.”

NABJ last month developed a new strategic plan, which includes: financial stability, a robust jobs effort to secure more employment for its members at media companies, more training and professional development, more advocacy efforts for black journalists and coverage of issues in the black community and a revision of its convention site selection.

KC People

KCABJ’s membership inched up by one with the addition of Carlotta Berry.

Gerald Jordan, a founding member of KCABJ in 1981, was honored in 2016 with the Arkansas Press Association’s Distinguished Service Award. Jordan had been the first African American sportswriter at The Kansas City Star and the first African American to serve on the newspaper’s editorial board in the mid-1970s. He is an associate professor of journalism at the University of Arkansas – Fayetteville.

KCABJ President Lewis Diuguid had his third book published in April. The title is “Our Fathers: Making Black Men.”

 

KCABJ Newsletter for April 2017

April 16, 2017 - Leave a Response

KCABJ Academy

The Kansas City Association of Black Journalists Urban Student Journalism Academy will take place June 5 to June 16. This year it is being moved to the Urban League of Greater Kansas City, which has a smart classroom that will accommodate the two-week class.

The applications have gone out to journalism instructors throughout the Kansas City area to seek students who plan to go to college to enter the journalism profession.

A maximum of 12 students and a minimum of six are needed for the class of 2017. The application is below. The deadline is Saturday, April 29. There will be no extensions.

At the April monthly meeting, KCABJ Secretary Anita Parran said she will start sending the minutes to Treasurer Bette Tate-Beaver ahead of the monthly gathering so that members can have access to them via email.

KCABJ President Lewis Diuguid told members in attendance that he has started to reach out to potential KCABJ members and past members to get them to join the organization. Email that went out in April will be followed up with phone calls to get people back in the fold. With cutbacks on news media hiring of journalists of color, KCABJ is needed now more than ever.

Anita suggested possibly changing the meeting date to make it possible for more people to attend. Bette said she would poll the membership to determine what date works best for most people.

NABJ News

The National Association of Black Journalists has developed a strategic plan that includes five strategies:

  • Financial and Organizational Stability. No more of that deficit spending.
  • NABJ Jobs involving more hires and promotions in the news industry for journalists of color.
  • Training and Professional Development.
  • Advocacy Activities to speak out more for the needs of journalists of color and for coverage of issues relevant to the black community in the U.S. and internationally.
  • Special Projects, involving convention site selection.

NABJ at its April board meeting named 10 cities for NABJ to explore as future convention sites. They are Atlanta, Chicago, Charlotte, Dallas, Las Vegas, New Orleans, New York, Orlando, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C.

Each is a city where NABJ has had a successful convention in the past.

2017 KCABJ Urban Student Journalism Academy Application

2017 Urban Student Journalism Academy

June 5-16, 2017

at the Urban League of Greater Kansas City

1710 the Paseo Blvd.

Sponsored by The Kansas City Association of Black Journalists

 

KCABJ is a not-for-profit corporation registered with the Secretary of State of Missouri and affiliated with the National Association of Black Journalists.

 

About the Kansas City Association of Black Journalists

 

KCABJ was founded in 1981, and this year it celebrates its 36th anniversary as an organization of professional black journalists. This is the 33th KCABJ Urban Student Journalism Academy. Many graduates of the program are established in the field or are pursuing careers in journalism.

For more information about the academy or the Kansas City Association of Black Journalists call KCABJ Vice President/Print Glenn E. Rice, a reporter with The Kansas City Star at 816-234-4341 or KCABJ President Lewis W. Diuguid at 816-730-9194.

 

About The Urban League of Greater Kansas City

 

The Urban League of Greater Kansas City has been part of the national network of Urban Leagues since 1919. Its mission is to enable African-Americans and other disadvantaged persons to secure economic self-reliance, parity, power and civil rights.  The Urban League’s programs provide assistance to area residents to help them gain employment and build sustainable careers. The Kansas City Association of Black Journalists is committed to working with high school and college students to prepare them for careers in print and broadcast journalism or other communications fields. This year’s academy continues that tradition.

 

The 2017 KCABJ Urban Journalism Academy is free to students. It is a commuter program and is conveniently located on a bus line in the Urban League’s newly remodeled high-tech classroom. There is a mandatory orientation on Saturday, June 3. The location will be announced to those students picked for the program. Each student is responsible for his or her own transportation to and from the KCABJ academy each day. Class begins at 8 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m.

 

This academy is unique in our area because it is taught by black journalists working for newspapers, television and radio stations, in public relations and new media in Greater Kansas City. Educators will add their knowledge to the instruction. Students will be:

— Assigned stories to report and write.

— They will work on computers.

— Shadow reporters.

— Study social media and its personal and population effects.

— Benefit from lectures from major newsmakers.

— Network with influential people.

— Produce their own newspaper and radio and television newscasts.

  • Tour area media companies.

 

Every student who attends the academy leaves with enhanced reading, writing, analytical, communication and questioning skills. Teachers and parents have said teenagers and young adults have returned from the summer energized and far more interested and able to learn than before.

 

Scholarships & Other Opportunities

Students selected for the academy will compete for scholarships offered by KCABJ. The awards go to the best students in the class. The class size will be limited to 12. Many of our graduates are award-winning journalists today.

To Apply

  1. Write a one-page essay on the role people of color should have in journalism.
  2. Send one sample of your writing — if possible something that has been published (e.g. an article in your school newspaper). We are seeking committed students who are not afraid of hard work and who already have a demonstrated interest in journalism.
  3. Mail this completed application, your essay and writing sample by April 29, 2017, to KCABJ, P.O. Box 32744, Kansas City, Mo. 64111.

 

Academy Application

 

Name_______________________________

 

Email:______________________________

 

Male___ Female___Birthdate_________

 

Address_____________________________

 

City_________________ State/ZIP _______

 

Phone ____________________________________

 

School Name_______________________________

 

Year in School________________________

 

GPA________________________________

 

Journalism/English/Yearbook Teacher’s Name:

 

____________________________________

 

In which area are you most interested? Rank

each 1, 2, 3 or 4 with your favorite being #1.

_____Newspaper     Television ________

 

______Radio      Public Relations _____

 

List journalism and/or writing experience in courses you have taken or media companies

where you’ve worked:__________________

 

_________________________________________________________________________

 

On a separate sheet of paper list your career

goals and why you want to attend this academy.

 

Student signature____________________________

 

 

Signature of Parent/Legal Guardian_____________________________

KCABJ Continues to Help Inspire High School Journalists

April 13, 2017 - Leave a Response

Kansas City Association of Black Journalist President Lewis W. Diuguid spoke on Wednesday, April 12 with Lori Oyler’s journalism class at Liberty High School in Liberty, Mo. Bette Tate-Beaver, KCABJ treasurer, also spoke with the class about careers in journalism. KCABJ this summer is offering its Urban Student Journalism Academy to high school and college students seeking a career in broadcast, newspaper, magazine or new media journalism.

Photo by Leilah Cunningham

KCABJ Meets with Journalists from 5 Countries

April 11, 2017 - Leave a Response

Kansas City Association of Black Journalists President Lewis W. Diuguid and KCABJ Treasurer Bette Tate-Beaver (center) on Monday, April 10 spent close to two hours talking with journalists from five countries about the challenges that journalists of color face in the United States. The visiting journalists were Klementina Cenkollari, a political reporter/anchorwoman with ORA News in Albania; Ali Abdulhusain Jawad Khalil Radhi, senior presenter, Ministry of Information in Bahrain; Suhaila MD Zaini, coordinating producer, News Magazine: Business & Tech, Radio Television Malaysia; Luis Pablo Beauregard Alday, reporter, El Pais in Mexico; and Piotr Kusmierzak with Polsat News in Poland. Global Ties KC coordinated the visit at its Union Station office. The group, which also visited The Call of Kansas City, was invited to the United States under the auspices of the U.S. Department of State’s International Visitors Leadership Program. The group reached out to KCABJ because of information Global Ties KC picked up from KCABJ’s website, kcabj.org.

Photo by Leilah Cunningham

KCABJ Urban Student Journalism Academy for 2017

April 4, 2017 - Leave a Response

2017 Urban Student Journalism Academy

June 5-16, 2017

at the Urban League of Greater Kansas City

1710 the Paseo Blvd.

Sponsored by The Kansas City Association of Black Journalists

 

KCABJ is a not-for-profit corporation registered with the Secretary of State of Missouri and affiliated with the National Association of Black Journalists.

 

About the Kansas City Association of Black Journalists

 

KCABJ was founded in 1981, and this year it celebrates its 36th anniversary as an organization of professional black journalists. This is the 33th KCABJ Urban Student Journalism Academy. Many graduates of the program are established in the field or are pursuing careers in journalism.

For more information about the academy or the Kansas City Association of Black Journalists call KCABJ Vice President/Print Glenn E. Rice, a reporter with The Kansas City Star at 816-234-4341 or KCABJ President Lewis W. Diuguid at 816-730-9194.

 

About The Urban League of Greater Kansas City

 

The Urban League of Greater Kansas City has been part of the national network of Urban Leagues since 1919. Its mission is to enable African-Americans and other disadvantaged persons to secure economic self-reliance, parity, power and civil rights.  The Urban League’s programs provide assistance to area residents to help them gain employment and build sustainable careers. The Kansas City Association of Black Journalists is committed to working with high school and college students to prepare them for careers in print and broadcast journalism or other communications fields. This year’s academy continues that tradition.

 

The 2017 KCABJ Urban Journalism Academy is free to students. It is a commuter program and is conveniently located on a bus line in the Urban League’s newly remodeled high-tech classroom. There is a mandatory orientation on Saturday, June 3. The location will be announced to those students picked for the program. Each student is responsible for his or her own transportation to and from the KCABJ academy each day. Class begins at 8 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m.

 

This academy is unique in our area because it is taught by black journalists working for newspapers, television and radio stations, in public relations and new media in Greater Kansas City. Educators will add their knowledge to the instruction. Students will be:

— Assigned stories to report and write.

— They will work on computers.

— Shadow reporters.

— Study social media and its personal and population effects.

— Benefit from lectures from major newsmakers.

— Network with influential people.

— Produce their own newspaper and radio and television newscasts.

— Tour area media companies.

 

Every student who attends the academy leaves with enhanced reading, writing, analytical, communication and questioning skills. Teachers and parents have said teenagers and young adults have returned from the summer energized and far more interested and able to learn than before.

 

Scholarships & Other Opportunities

Students selected for the academy will compete for scholarships offered by KCABJ. The awards go to the best students in the class. The class size will be limited to 12. Many of our graduates are award-winning journalists today.

To Apply

  1. Write a one-page essay on the role people of color should have in journalism.
  2. Send one sample of your writing — if possible something that has been published (e.g. an article in your school newspaper). We are seeking committed students who are not afraid of hard work and who already have a demonstrated interest in journalism.
  3. Mail this completed application, your essay and writing sample by April 29, 2017, to KCABJ, P.O. Box 32744, Kansas City, Mo. 64111.

 

Academy Application

 

Name_____________________________________

 

Email:____________________________________

 

Male______ Female _______ Birth date_________

 

Address___________________________________

 

City_________________ State/ZIP _____________

 

Phone ____________________________________

 

School Name_______________________________

 

Year in School ______________________________

 

GPA_______________________________________

 

Journalism/English/Yearbook Teacher’s Name:

 

___________________________________________

 

In which area are you most interested? Rank

each 1, 2, 3 or 4 with your favorite being #1.

_____Newspaper              Television ________

 

______Radio                     Public Relations _____

 

List journalism and/or writing experience in courses you have taken or media companies

where you’ve worked:________________________________________________________

 

_________________________________________________________________________

 

On a separate sheet of paper list your career

goals and why you want to attend this academy.

 

Student signature_______________________________________

 

 

Signature of Parent/Legal Guardian_____________________________________________

 

 

KCABJ at Harvard University

March 18, 2017 - Leave a Response

KCABJ President Lewis Diuguid and Treasurer Bette Tate-Beaver were at Harvard University for a visiting fellowship. They got to spend time with Jenee’ Osterheldt, a Nieman Foundation fellow at Harvard and attend black history lectures by Professor Cornel West and Professor Henry Louis Gates.

2017 KCABJ Urban Student Journalism Academy

March 18, 2017 - Leave a Response

2017 KCABJ Urban Student Journalism Academy

June 5-16, 2017

at the Urban League of Greater Kansas City

1710 the Paseo Blvd.

Sponsored by The Kansas City Association of Black Journalists

 

KCABJ is a not-for-profit corporation registered with the Secretary of State of Missouri and affiliated with the National Association of Black Journalists.

 

About the Kansas City Association of Black Journalists

 

KCABJ was founded in 1981, and this year it celebrates its 36th anniversary as an organization of professional black journalists. This is the 33th KCABJ Urban Student Journalism Academy. Many graduates of the program are established in the field or are pursuing careers in journalism.

For more information about the academy or the Kansas City Association of Black Journalists call KCABJ Vice President/Print Glenn E. Rice, a reporter with The Kansas City Star at 816-234-4341 or KCABJ President Lewis W. Diuguid at 816-730-9194.

 

About The Urban League of Greater Kansas City

 

The Urban League of Greater Kansas City has been part of the national network of Urban Leagues since 1919. Its mission is to enable African-Americans and other disadvantaged persons to secure economic self-reliance, parity, power and civil rights.  The Urban League’s programs provide assistance to area residents to help them gain employment and build sustainable careers. The Kansas City Association of Black Journalists is committed to working with high school and college students to prepare them for careers in print and broadcast journalism or other communications fields. This year’s academy continues that tradition.

 

The 2017 KCABJ Urban Journalism Academy is free to students. It is a commuter program and is conveniently located on a bus line in the Urban League’s newly remodeled high-tech classroom. There is a mandatory orientation on Saturday, June 3. The location will be announced to those students picked for the program. Each student is responsible for his or her own transportation to and from the KCABJ academy each day. Class begins at 8 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m.

 

This academy is unique in our area because it is taught by black journalists working for newspapers, television and radio stations, in public relations and new media in Greater Kansas City. Educators will add their knowledge to the instruction. Students will be:

— Assigned stories to report and write.

— They will work on computers.

— Shadow reporters.

— Study social media and its personal and population effects.

— Benefit from lectures from major newsmakers.

— Network with influential people.

— Produce their own newspaper and radio and television newscasts.

— Tour area media companies.

 

Every student who attends the academy leaves with enhanced reading, writing, analytical, communication and questioning skills. Teachers and parents have said teen-agers and young adults have returned from the summer energized and far more interested and able to learn than before.

 

Scholarships & Other Opportunities

Students selected for the academy will compete for scholarships offered by KCABJ. The awards go to the best students in the class. The class size will be limited to 12. Many of our graduates are award-winning journalists today.

To Apply

  1. Write a one-page essay on the role people of color should have in journalism.
  2. Send one sample of your writing — if possible something that has been published (e.g. an article in your school newspaper). We are seeking committed students who are not afraid of hard work and who already have a demonstrated interest in journalism.
  3. Mail this completed application, your essay and writing sample by April 29, 2017, to KCABJ, P.O. Box 32744, Kansas City, Mo. 64111.

 

Academy Application

 

Name_____________________________________

 

Email:____________________________________

 

Male______ Female _______ Birth date_________

 

Address___________________________________

 

City_________________ State/ZIP _____________

 

Phone ____________________________________

 

School Name_______________________________

 

Year in School ______________________________

 

GPA_______________________________________

 

Journalism/English/Yearbook Teacher’s Name:

 

___________________________________________

 

In which area are you most interested? Rank

each 1, 2, 3 or 4 with your favorite being #1.

_____Newspaper              Television ________

 

______Radio                     Public Relations _____

 

List journalism and/or writing experience in courses you have taken or media companies

where you’ve worked:________________________________________________________

 

_________________________________________________________________________

 

On a separate sheet of paper list your career

goals and why you want to attend this academy.

 

Student signature_______________________________________

 

 

Signature of Parent/Legal Guardian_____________________________________________

 

 

KCABJ Newsletter for March 2017

March 18, 2017 - Leave a Response

KCABJ Academy

KCABJ members decided at the March meeting to stay on schedule with the start of the KCABJ Urban Student Journalism Academy. No dates have been set yet.

However, applications will be emailed to Kansas City area journalism advisers to interest area students in journalism careers.

One thing that came from KCABJ President Lewis Diuguid and KCABJ Treasurer Bette Tate-Beaver being at Harvard University in February on a nearly three-week visiting fellowship at the Nieman Foundation was that the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States has created a new interest in journalism careers. People are hungry for the truth and upset with the lies and offensiveness from the new administration in the White House.

Trump is giving journalism as a career the same shot in the arm that Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein did when they were Washington Post reporters exposing the criminal wrongdoing and cover-ups of the administration of President Richard Nixon.

The KCABJ academy applications will go out the weekend of March 17. The deadline for students to mail back the application and the needed material will be set for the end of April. The academy will include more social media instruction for the students.

A couple of wrinkles with the program were discussed — including printing the student newspaper. Solution: Online content only in a newspaper format so students can printout their stories and email them to colleges and potential employers.

Classroom space at MCC-Penn Valley, the loss of Joe Seabrooks as a contact and the outrageous insurance expense. Solution: Move the academy to another midtown location that is just as accessible on a bus line without the insurance cost.

Members at the meeting also plan to reach out in the coming weeks to other journalists working in the metropolitan area to join KCABJ. The next membership meeting is set for April 15.

NABJ News

National Association of Black Journalist President Sarah Glover has appointed Cheryl Smith as the organization’s new secretary. Smith, who is with the Dallas-Fort Worth Association of Black Journalists, had served as Region VII Director for NABJ.

The NABJ convention will take place Aug. 9-13 at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside. The room rate is $154 + tax. People can make their reservations by calling 504-584-3959. Also be sure to register for the convention at nabj.org.

 

KC People

India Williams renewed her membership in KCABJ. India works at KIPP Academy. She also was a student in the KCABJ Urban Student Journalism Academy when she was a teenager.

Another former KCABJ academy graduate, Ramanda Hicks, celebrated her 40th birthday earlier this year. Friends and family attended, including Kansas Sen. David Haley. Ramanda had served KCABJ for several years as vice president for print.

KCABJ President Lewis W. Diuguid on Feb. 15 received the Louis M. Lyons Award for Conscience and Integrity in Journalism from the Nieman Foundation at Harvard University, where Jenee’ Osterheldt from The Kansas City Star is a Nieman Fellow. KCABJ Treasurer Bette Tate-Beaver accompanied Lewis to Harvard, where they both were visiting fellows for more than two weeks on the Cambridge campus. They attended several lectures and spoke on a number of occasions with students.

 

KCABJ Membership Application for 2014

Mail this application with your $35 check or money order to KCABJ, P.O. Box 32744, Kansas City, Mo. 64111. It covers your annual membership dues. Membership entitles you to receive the KCABJ monthly newsletter on the KCABJ website at kcabj.org and emailed monthly meeting notices.

 

NAME______________________________

 

DATE______________________________

 

HOME ADDRESS_________________________

 

 

Email address____________________________

 

Phone (w) _________________________

 

(h)________________________________

 

Cellphone __________________________

Occupation (Title, company and address):

____________________________________

 

FULL/ASSOCIATE/STUDENT MEMBER

(circle one)

 

Years of Experience________________________

 

KCABJ and/or NABJ member

(circle one or both)

 

(Membership in KCABJ runs from January through December. Annual dues of $35 is the lowest of any of the affiliates of the National  Association of Black Journalists. Membership is subsidized by donations from KCABJ members.)

 

KCABJ Newsletter for February 2017

February 11, 2017 - Leave a Response

KCABJ Membership

The Kansas City Association of Black Journalists at its February membership meeting voted to retain all officers in their current positions. The KCABJ vice president/broadcasting remains open. Broadcast journalists who are interested in the position should email KCABJ President Lewis Diuguid at lewisdiuguid@gmail.com.

In addition to Lewis continuing as president, Glenn E. Rice will serve as vice president/print; Anita Parran, secretary; and Bette Beaver, treasurer.

KCABJ members discussed the KCABJ Urban Student Journalism Academy. KCABJ since 1982 has annually offered a journalism academy to high school and college students interested in journalism careers. It has occurred the last several years at the Metropolitan Community College-Penn Valley.

Glenn said there would be many challenges to the academy taking place this summer. Increasing demands in the news industry now makes it difficult for Kansas City area broadcast and print journalists to volunteer time to serve on the staff of the academy.

Included among the challenges will be producing a 2017 edition of the KCABJ Journal. Glenn explained that The Kansas City Star in the past has printed the tabloid newspaper for KCABJ at no cost. But there may not be personnel available at the newspaper to do the work to make that possible. KCABJ is exploring an all-digital product, which students can printout and show their work.

Discussion on the academy for 2017 will be a key agenda item at the March 18 membership meeting. Also tabled until the March meeting is further discussion on the editorial board of The Star having no African Americans in a city that is about 30 percent black. It has become a hot topic of conversation in the white, black and Latino communities in the Kansas City area.

The concern centers on not only there being no black voice being part of the institutional voice of the newspaper but that the African American The Star picks for the position accurately and fairly represent the people of the community and not voice some far off, far-right position. “You could have a (President Donald) Trump in blackface,” one KCABJ member said at the February membership meeting. That would not accurately reflect the political and racial sentiments of the community.

Another concern is the small number of African American and Latino reporters on The Star staff for a metropolitan community of about 2 million people. Again, this has not gone unnoticed in the community especially as the newspaper continues to hire young white journalists. The old line in the news industry of editors being unable to find qualified African Americans for newspaper jobs is nothing more than a pathetic excuse. The Greater Kansas City community deserves better.

NABJ News

The National Association of Black Journalists invites members to submit workshop proposals for the 2017 Convention. It will take place Aug. 9-13 in New Orleans. People must be a current NABJ member to submit a workshop proposal.

The workshops last 90 minutes and are limited to four panel members. Workshop coordinators and panelists are permitted to participate in only two workshops.

A programming committee will review all of the proposals. The deadline for submissions is Feb. 15.

For more information go to https://www.nabjconvention.com/abstract.cfm.

KC People

KCABJ’s membership increased by one with the renewal of India Williams. In addition to being on the staff at KIPP-KC Academy, India oversees Generation Rap on KPRS-FM. She said she would like to make the KCABJ journalism academy available to students on the popular Saturday morning radio program. India was a graduate of the academy when she was a teenager.

KCABJ Membership Application for 2017

Mail this application with your $35 check or money order to KCABJ, P.O. Box 32744, Kansas City, Mo. 64111. KCABJ at the monthly meetings also takes credit cards and cash. Your membership covers your annual membership dues. Membership entitles you to receive the KCABJ monthly newsletter sent via email and emailed monthly meeting notices.

 

NAME_______________________________

 

DATE_______________________________

 

ADDRESS___________________________

 

 

Email _______________________________

 

Phone (w) ___________________________

 

(h)__________________________________

 

Cell _________________________________

 

Occupation (Title, company and address):

 

 

 

 

 

FULL/ASSOCIATE/STUDENT MEMBER

(circle one)

 

Years of Experience___________________

 

KCABJ and/or NABJ member

(circle one or both)

 

(Membership in KCABJ runs from January through December. KCABJ is an affiliate of the National Association of Black

Journalists. Membership is subsidized by donations from KCABJ members.)

KCABJ meets the third Saturday at 11 a.m. Contact Lewis Diuguid at lewisdiuguid@gmail.com for the location.

 

KCABJ Newsletter for January 2017

January 28, 2017 - Leave a Response

Encouraging Start

KCABJ members began the New Year with the decision to continue the 36-year-old organization’s core programs.

They include the KCABJ Urban Student Journalism Academy in the summer at Metropolitan Community College-Penn Valley and the KCABJ Media Awards in the fall. Since 1982, the annual KCABJ academy has been the organization’s response to area media executives saying they can’t find African Americans who want to work as journalists. KCABJ identifies high school and college students of all colors with an interest in journalism careers, and then through the academy provides them with an intensive training in print, broadcast and new media journalism so they are equipped for colleges and careers. KCABJ provides the top academy graduates with scholarships to further enable them in the profession. In addition, KCABJ members have told the students they will remain mentors to the young people for life, providing college and career feedback, guidance and references when needed. The academy this summer will include a stronger digital component because that is the emphasis of today’s news media.

The KCABJ Media Awards begun in 1991 help to push the area news media and public relations companies to provide in-depth, honest coverage of African Americans and other people of color. The awards for nearly three decades have honored the work of journalists and media companies doing enterprising work about African Americans and other people of color. People are producing great journalism — but except for the KCABJ awards — it goes mostly unnoticed.

The membership left no question that KCABJ must remain a viable, strong, and independent organization to compel the news media in the Kansas City area toward hiring and promoting more African American journalists. There has been a very noticeable, unforgivable and irresponsible retreat by television and radio stations and the print media in keeping up with the diversity and demographic advances in the metropolitan area population. That has to change.

The metropolitan area community is poorly served when the Greater Kansas City media deliberately fail to be inclusive. Without the truth about people of color being good, hard-working, taxpaying citizens doing their best to raise their families and be engaged in the community, the ages-old stereotypes and biases about African Americans and other minorities will dominate, and any chance of opportunities and equity for all will disappear in a cloaked haze of discrimination and white privilege.

The membership decided at the January meeting to elect officers at the Feb. 11 meeting. Look for an email announcement on the time and location of the meeting in February. Those with an interest in running should make sure their dues for 2017 is paid and email KCABJ President Lewis Diuguid at diuguidlj@yahoo.com.

Members also discussed the possibility of KCABJ sponsoring a community forum on a hot, newsworthy topic. The organization has done it before, and they have been well-attended.

In addition, KCABJ reiterated that it will remain supportive of its members in their job-related struggles. Unfortunately, being black in news media jobs remains a challenge.

KCABJ Treasurer Bette Tate-Beaver and Secretary Anita Parran reported that the 2016 awards program was successful. It took place at KMBC-TV, Channel 9, and All-Star Awards produced some outstanding monuments that went to the award recipients (See the December 2016 KCABJ Newsletter).

NABJ News

National Association of Black Journalists President Sarah Glover has appointed Alexis Mitchell as the new chair for the NABJ Student Education Enrichment and Development Program (SEED). 

Some things she will oversee are:

 

The theme of this year’s NABJ convention is “Power Up and Break Through.” Glover writes: “Ryan Williams and Ava Thompson Greenwell will lead NABJ’s convention efforts in New Orleans in 2017. Ryan did a phenomenal job co-organizing the historic #NABJNAHJ16 convention. Ava’s commitment to NABJ over the years and her efforts to amplify NABJ’s annual Ida B. Wells Award is noteworthy. I’m pleased we have two longtime and experienced members at the helm.”

Nominations are open now through March 3 for the NABJ Hall of Fame and for NABJ Special Honors. For more information go to https://nabj.secure-platform.com/a/page/HOF/HOFRULES for the NABJ Hall of Fame and to https://nabj.secure-platform.com/a/page/SH/SHRULES for the NABJ Special Honors.

KC People

   KCABJ’s membership increased with the addition of Anita Parran, Mara’ Rose Williams, Bette Tate-Beaver and Lewis Diuguid.

Congratulations are in order for KCABJ Secretary, longtime officer and member and Lifetime Achievement Award winner Anita Parran. In January she retired as director of communications with the AARP in Missouri. That position is open, and it would be great to have an African American with journalism experience pick up where Anita did exceptional work.

KCABJ academy student Tre Williams is in his second year at The Wall Street Journal as a reporter in New York City. He took an internship with The Journal in Washington, D.C., and turned it into a full-time job.

KCABJ Treasurer Bette Tate-Beaver at KKFI-FM’s request is to work with the station on its anti-discrimination efforts.

 

KCABJ Membership Application for 2014

Membership has its privileges. Mail this application with your $35 check or money order to KCABJ, P.O. Box 32744, Kansas City, Mo. 64111. It covers your annual membership dues. Membership entitles you to receive the KCABJ monthly newsletter and emailed monthly meeting notices.

 

NAME______________________________

 

DATE______________________________

 

HOME ADDRESS_________________________

 

 

Email address____________________________

 

Phone (w) _________________________

 

(h)________________________________

 

Cellphone __________________________

Occupation (Title, company and address):

____________________________________

 

FULL/ASSOCIATE/STUDENT MEMBER

(circle one)

 

Years of Experience________________________

 

KCABJ and/or NABJ member

(circle one or both)

 

(Membership in KCABJ runs from January through December. Annual dues of $35 is the lowest of any of the affiliates of the National  Association of Black Journalists. Membership is subsidized by donations from KCABJ members.)

For more information or news about KCABJ members, email KCABJ President Lewis Diuguid at diuguidlj@yahoo.com.